Sun Tzu’s Art of War

Wei Guangqing
2022

The Art of War, an ancient military treatise composed of thirteen chapters, is traditionally attributed to the military strategist Sun Wu, and dated to the Late Spring and Autumn Period (771 – 476 BCE). While in antiquity, the text served as a primer for inspiring soldiers, it has expanded its influence into politics, economics, and commerce in modern times.

Wei Guangqing drew inspiration from Ming Dynasty (1368 – 1644) woodblock illustrations of Sun Tzu’s Art of War, in which thirteen chapters and two additional portraits of Sun Wu and his disciple Sun Bin comprise a total of fifteen images. Wei highlights characters in bright colors, representative of his iconic Cultural Pop style, while juxtaposing the illustration against a dull grey chessboard background, in which the arrangements of the game pieces all result in a draw. Wei attracts further visual interest by applying varying thickness of paint on different color planes, creating an intricate relief effect.

Wei Guangqing’s Cultural Pop reexamines a classical text and reinterprets the value of traditional culture in a contemporary setting. In Wei’s Art of War, the composition is intelligently planned out and painting meticulously executed, in the fashion of a military exercise or a skillful game of chess. Ultimately, the viewer is invited to reflect on the ancient wisdom of the legendary Sun Tzu and find resonance in the strategy of their modern lives.

Wei Guangqing, The Art of War, 2019, Acrylic on Canvas, 80 x 80 cm x 16 © Wei Guangqing

Brocade of Spring

Tzeng Yong-ning
March 2022

Tzeng Yong-ning’s Brocade of Spring series, features many motifs taken from traditional architecture. The jagged white lines found throughout the composition resemble wooden lattice windows, while the background shapes are reminiscent of brickwork and masonry. The dabs of golden ink not only allude to the art of calligraphy, but also the beloved motif of bamboo.

Tzeng Yong-ning, Brocade of Spring 02, 2020 – 2021, Ball-point Pen and Acrylic on Paper, 75 x 107 cm © Tzeng Yong-ning

Related Exhibitions

Fire and Water

Xue Song
May 18 – July 14, 2019

previous arrow
Xue Song, Mask, 2017
Xue Song, Spring Colors, 2019
Xue Song, Lakeshore in Autumn Colors, 2016
Xue Song, Autumn Colors, 2016
Xue Song, Smooth Sailing, 2018
Xue Song, Reminiscing Under Pine, 2016
Xue Song, New Heights, 2020
next arrow
 
Xue Song, <i>Mask,</i> 2017
Xue Song, <i>Spring Colors,</i> 2019
Xue Song, <i>Lakeshore in Autumn Colors,</i> 2016
Xue Song,<i> Autumn Colors,</i> 2016
Xue Song,<i> Smooth Sailing,</i> 2018
Xue Song,<i> Reminiscing Under Pine,</i> 2016
Xue Song,<i> New Heights,</i> 2020
previous arrow
next arrow

From the ashes of two fires in a single studio, a Chinese contemporary artist is born. Xue Song’s method of burnt collage can be use to depict any genre, but the images he selects and the compositions he creates are strictly his own, reflecting on him as an artist and as a person. Rather than concentrating solely on the destructive nature of fire or the sheer visual impact of Pop art, Xue Song finds balance in his work by rediscovering motifs from the classical tradition of ink and wash. In this way, Xue Song’s art sing a song of both water and fire.

May 8 – November 20, 2021
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 11:00 am – 6:00 pm


Related Exhibitions

Attachment

Guo Kai
January 9 – March 9, 2021




previous arrow
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201901, 2019
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201903, 2019
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201902, 2019
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 202001, 2020
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201810, 2018
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201912, 2019
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201911, 2019
Guo Kai, Snowy Hill, 2020
Guo Kai, Quiet Fantasy 201910, 2019
Guo Kai, Huizhou 201905, 2019
next arrow
 
Guo Kai,<i> Quiet Fantasy 201901,</i> 2019
Guo Kai, <i>Quiet Fantasy 201903,</i> 2019
Guo Kai, <i> Quiet Fantasy 201902,</i> 2019
Guo Kai, <i>Quiet Fantasy 202001,</i> 2020
Guo Kai,<i> Quiet Fantasy 201810,</i> 2018
Guo Kai, <i>Quiet Fantasy 201912,</i> 2019
Guo Kai, <i>Quiet Fantasy 201911,</i> 2019
Guo Kai, Snowy Hill, </i>2020
Guo Kai, <i>Quiet Fantasy 201910,</i> 2019
Guo Kai, <i>Huizhou 201905,</i> 2019
previous arrow
next arrow


In recent years, the subject of Guo Kai’s landscape paintings has gradually transitioned, from the deconstruction and reconstruction of traditional architecture nestled within a natural landscape to the landscape itself, specifically mountains, and the visual and symbolic significance mountains hold. As an architecture professor at Hefei University of Technology, Guo often accompanies students to draw from life from the abundance of heritage architecture in the southern regions of Anhui province. However, in recent years, the classic motifs of Chinese architecture, such as curving rooflines and grand archways seldom appear on his canvases, and are instead replaced with increasing abstract ensembles of mountains, from life drawing trips that he takes alone deep in the reaches of famous mountains like the Yellow Mountain. In terms of composition, the absence of a formal subject allows him to take complete and personal command of the canvas, where the faint contours of mountains become an elegant system of the artist’s symbols and gestures. With his muted palette and images frozen in time, this shift in subject has given Guo Kai a sense of belonging or attachment at the very heart of traditional Chinese landscape painting – the mountains.

Yi Art Institute
3F, Elephant Duo Art District, Lvzhoudong Road, Shushan District, Hefei
August 8 – September 7, 2020
Reception: Saturday, August 8, 3:00 pm
Hours: 10:00 am – 8:00 pm

Gallery Touring Exhibition
January 9 – March 9, 2021
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 11:00 am – 6:00 pm


Related Exhibitions

Faraway Breeze

Guo Kai
Sept 15 – 24, 2018
National Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall, Taipei

Passing Landscapes

Tzeng Yong-ning
October 10 – December 12, 2020




previous arrow
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
next arrow
 
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
Installation View
previous arrow
next arrow


Works






previous arrow
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape - Uphill 10, 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape - Uphill 08, 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape - Uphill 04, 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape - Circuit 01, 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape - Circuit 06, 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 70, 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 73, 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, Swaying Flowers 08, 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Plenary 05, 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Plenary 06, 2019 - 2020
next arrow
 
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Landscape - Uphill 10,</i> 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Landscape - Uphill 08,</i> 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Landscape - Uphill 04,</i> 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning,<i> Landscape - Circuit 01,</i> 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning,<i> Landscape - Circuit 06,</i> 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning,<i> Bloom 70,</i> 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning,<i> Bloom 73,</i> 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning,<i> Swaying Flowers 08,</i> 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>The Flower of Plenary 05,</i> 2019 - 2020
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>The Flower of Plenary 06,</i> 2019 - 2020
previous arrow
next arrow


Passing Landscapes not only expands on established series, but also develops two new ones, Landscape – Uphill and Landscape – Circuit. Regardless of belonging to new or old series, all works are rich in subject matter and exceptional in execution. New works from the Bloom series have new blossoms of creativity; new Swaying Flowers are brighter and more colorful; and new works from the gold-foiled The Flower of Plenary have expanded on the central circular motif into more elaborate compositions, while retaining the strong visual impact of the gold-foil.

Landscape – Uphill feature an ensemble of bizarre shapes stacked on top of each other, in which the title Uphill suggests movement and sense of growth. Landscape – Circuit is inspired by a sub-genre of painting in the early Song Dynasty called Small Scenery Painting (xiao jing). At a more intimate scale, more attention is given to detail, where each and every detail is intertwined and tightly knit into the overall composition, and the sense of movement appears to flow in a continuous array of lines and circles; hence the name Circuit.

October 10 – December 12, 2020
Hours: 2:00 – 6:00 pm


Exhibitions NEWS

Cultural Minister Lee & Executive Director Reeves Visit

Honor
Tzeng Yong-ning
Cultural Minister Lee Yung-te and Executive Director Jordan Reeves were impressed by Tzeng’s work, especially the strong use of colors and the incorporation of Taiwanese elements.
Gallery Director Elaine Liu, Executive Director Jordan Reeves, Artist Tzeng Yong-ning, Cultural Minister Lee Yung-te, Manager Richard Chang, & Art Director Timothy Chang. Photo: Ming Kong


Exhibition Catalog

Passing Landscapes

Catalog
Tzeng Yong-ning Solo Exhibition
Lofty Culture & Art, 2020
© Loftyart Gallery


Related Exhibitions

The Flower of Plenary

Tzeng Yong-ning
October 5 – December 7, 2019




previous arrow
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Plenary 03, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Penary 02, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Swaying Flower 01, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 61, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 62, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 63, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 64, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Bloom 68, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Small Brocade 11, 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, Small Brocade 12, 2019
next arrow
 
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>The Flower of Plenary 03, </i>2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>The Flower of Penary 02,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Swaying Flower 01, </i>2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Bloom 61,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Bloom 62,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Bloom 63,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Bloom 64,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Bloom 68,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Small Brocade 11,</i> 2019
Tzeng Yong-ning, <i>Small Brocade 12,</i> 2019
previous arrow
next arrow


In Tzeng Yong-ning’s gold-foiled The Flower of Plenary series, a large circle dominates the composition, and is in turn filled with countless smaller circles, of various patterns, colors, sizes. Packed together tightly, there is a sense of unity and harmony, due to the fact that all the individuals are grouped together in a comprehensive whole. Yet, each circle is lively and energetic, seemingly expanding outwards, floating upwards, or squeezing each other. Encompassed in a field of gold, the large circle embodies a solemn planet, sitting scared and elegant in the serenity of space.

October 5 – December 7, 2019
Reception: Saturday, October 5, 4:00 pm
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 2:00 – 6:00 pm


Related Publication

Related Exhibitions

Beyond Abstraction

Wang Yigang
May 5 – June 2, 2018




previous arrow
Wang Yigang, S66, 2016
Wang Yigang, S131, 2017
Wang Yigang, S94, 2017
Wang Yigang, S98, 2017
Wang Yigang, R17, 2016
Wang Yigang, S95, 2014
Wang Yigang, Abstract Work No. 28, 1993
Wang Yigang, Absract Work 1992, No. 38, 1992
next arrow
 
Wang Yigang,<i> S66,</i> 2016
Wang Yigang,<i> S131,</i> 2017
Wang Yigang,<i> S94,</i> 2017
Wang Yigang,<i> S98,</i> 2017
Wang Yigang,<i> R17,</i> 2016
Wang Yigang, <i>S95,</i> 2014
Wang Yigang, <i>Abstract Work No. 28,</i> 1993
Wang Yigang, <i>Absract Work 1992, No. 38,</i> 1992
previous arrow
next arrow


In the 1980s, as a student at Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts, Wang Yigang began his pursue for individuality and self-expression, and adopted Western Modernism in retaliation against conservative art education. After ten years of experimentation with different styles, Wang favored German Expressionism by the early 1990s, which he studied, experimented, but ultimately rejected. By the late 1990s; however, Japanese Post-war art movements caught his attention, particularly Mono-ha and Gutai, which drew upon and expressed Eastern culture on the basis and success of Western Modernist modes. This prompted Wang to revisit Eastern culture, especially Buddhist Chan (Zen) philosophy, which redirected his struggle for individuality toward self-understanding. In this awakening, his internal struggle transformed from against the society to the self, and in self-criticism, he found an abandonment of all conventional painting practices and discovered new meaning purely in the movements of his body during the act of painting. In this way, every artwork became a record of his movements through space and time.

From experimentation, rejection, to self-awareness, Wang Yigang’s art transcends the painterly image, rejects all conventional practices, and ultimately goes Beyond Abstraction.

May 5 – June 2, 2018
Reception: Saturday, May 5, 3:00 pm
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 2:00 – 6:00 pm

Pine.Smoke.Ink

Xue Song
January 6 – March 4, 2018




previous arrow
Xue Song, New Heights, 2015
Xue Song, Spring Colors, 2013
Xue Song, Autumn River Boating, 2015
Xue Song, Sailing Amidst Mountains, 2016
Xue Song, Tribute to Rothko I, 2015
Xue Song, Dialogue with Mondrian No. 4, 2012
Xue Song, Dialogue with Mondrian No. 8, 2012
Xue Song, Autumn Colors, 2016
Xue Song, Calligraphy Imagery, 2014
next arrow
 
Xue Song, <i>New Heights,</i> 2015
Xue Song, <i>Spring Colors,</i> 2013
Xue Song, <i>Autumn River Boating,</i> 2015
Xue Song,<i> Sailing Amidst Mountains,</i> 2016
Xue Song, <i>Tribute to Rothko I, </i>2015
Xue Song, <i>Dialogue with Mondrian No. 4,</i> 2012
Xue Song, <i>Dialogue with Mondrian No. 8,</i> 2012
Xue Song, <i>Autumn Colors, </i>2016
Xue Song, <i>Calligraphy Imagery,</i> 2014
previous arrow
next arrow


Pine smoke ink, famous throughout China, is a type of precious inkstick made from pine soot, or the deposition of smoke particles from burning pinewood. Xue Song, who is named after the great pines (song in Chinese) of Yellow Mountain, begins his collages by burning printed images, in which the ashes are collected and mixed into his paint; this artistic practice and synthetic medium can be regarded as a new Pine Smoke Ink.

Since the late 1990s, Xue Song has made extensive use of traditional Chinese calligraphy and painting, either as ready-made images for his burnt collage, or as classical themes to be reinvented in a contemporary context. Although his practice is derived from Pop Art, it carries a profound sense of Chinese culture and the spirit of ink painting. The artistic practice of Pine, Smoke, Ink opens a new chapter in genre of Modern Ink.

Ink Asia 2017
Hong Kong Convention Centre
December 15 – 17, 2017

Gallery Touring Exhibition
January 6 – March 4, 2018
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 2:00 – 6:00 pm


exhibition News

Collection by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Honor
Xue Song
During the Ink Asia 2017 art fair, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston made a decision to include Xue Song’s painting, Spring Colors, 2013, as part of the Museum’s permanent collection.
Timothy Chang, Art Director of Loftyart, with Nancy Berliner, Senior Curator of Chinese Art, MFA, Boston. Photo: Richard Chang

Exhibition Catalog

Related Exhibitions

Unaltered Landscapes

Xiong Wei
June 3 – July 1, 2017




previous arrow
Xiong Wei, R1412-2, 2014
Xiong Wei, Full Moon Night 1, 2014
Xiong Wei, LS1405-5, 2014
Xiong Wei, 1212-2, 2012
Xiong Wei, 1211, 2012
Xiong Wei, R1402-8, 2014
Xiong Wei, R003, 2014
Xiong Wei, R1506-4, 2015
Xiong Wei, 167-1, 2016
Xiong Wei, 1607-2B, 2016
next arrow
 
Xiong Wei, <i>R1412-2,</i> 2014
Xiong Wei,<i> Full Moon Night 1,</i> 2014
Xiong Wei, <i>LS1405-5,</i> 2014
Xiong Wei,<i> 1212-2,</i> 2012
Xiong Wei,<i> 1211,</i> 2012
Xiong Wei,<i> R1402-8,</i> 2014
Xiong Wei,<i> R003,</i> 2014
Xiong Wei,<i> R1506-4,</i> 2015
Xiong Wei,<i> 167-1,</i> 2016
Xiong Wei,<i> 1607-2B,</i> 2016
previous arrow
next arrow


As Xiong Wei’s mind wonders deeply into the realm of metaphysics, in either Chan (Zen) Buddhist teachings of Emptiness or Taoist Non-action, her landscapes transcend into total abstraction and brutal minimalism. All forms of traditional symbolism and linear representation is forgotten and left behind. There is only evidence of space and time, left by the artist’s brush. While the formal qualities of her so-called landscapes have dramatically changed, the spirit behind the image remains unaltered. Like Song Dynasty (960 – 1279) artists, Xiong Wei seeks to address philosophical concerns within the boundaries of her canvas, in which the painted image appears as enigmatic as that of the ancients before her, leaving only traces of her mind to be deciphered.

June 3 – July 1, 2017
Reception: Saturday, June 3, 3:00 pm
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 2:00 – 6:00 pm


Exhibition Catalog

Related Exhibitions

The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting III

Liu Kuo-sung
February 18 – April 15, 2017




previous arrow
Liu Kuo-sung, High Noon Festival, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Lantern Festival, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Which is Outside? 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Echoes of the Mountain, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, A Man of East, West, South, and North, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, White Snow is White, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Cliffs, Rocks, Mist, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Loftiness, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Universe in My Mind, 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, Quiet Night, Snowy Mountain, 2016
next arrow
 
Liu Kuo-sung, <i>High Noon Festival, </i>2016
Liu Kuo-sung, <b>Lantern Festival,</b> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung,<i> Which is Outside?</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung,<i> Echoes of the Mountain,</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, <i>A Man of East, West, South, and North,</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, <i>White Snow is White,</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung,<i> Cliffs, Rocks, Mist,</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung,<i> Loftiness,</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, <i>Universe in My Mind,</i> 2016
Liu Kuo-sung, <i>Quiet Night, Snowy Mountain, </i>2016
previous arrow
next arrow


Loftyart Gallery is proud to finally present the third series of Liu Kuo-sung Prints. Featuring lithography, woodblock, etching, and silkscreen printmaking, in a set of ten prints, this is the final series in Loftyart’s autographed handmade limited edition prints by Liu Kuo-sung. Since working with Liu on the first two series, the printmakers have further perfected their techniques and took on greater technical challenges in the third.

As the last and final series, Loftyart Gallery has worked together tirelessly, making the best finishing touches to this monumental project. In terms of the initial section of images, Loftyart Gallery selected from Liu Kuo-sung’s long and impressive oeuvre, most important and defining artworks, many of which belong in museum collections. The images are then recreated with the distinct painterly qualities of printmaking, while faithfully preserving the spirit of Liu’s original artwork.

The art of Liu Kuo-sung’s prints not only lies in the greatness of the original composition, but also in the distinct characters of printmaking incorporated by the printmakers, in their artful recreation the artworks. Visiting the printmaking studio time and time again in the last three years, Liu Kuo-sung’s kind guidance, thoughtful demonstration, and warm communication with the printmakers, making corrections and additions on every test run, has given Loftyart Gallery the pleasure and honor to produce three outstanding series of autographed handmade limited edition prints, ultimately setting new standards in the field of contemporary printmaking, as well as promoting Liu Kuo-sung’s spirit and contributions in Modern Ink Painting.

February 18 – April 15, 2017
Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 2:00 – 6:00 pm


Related Catalogs

Related Exhibitions