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Primitive Ecology of Art

Essay
Primitive Landscape of Belief
The term “primitive” can be defined as an initial stage in evolutionary development. “Ecology” is the state in which organisms live and adapt in a given natural environment. Therefore, “primitive ecology” refers to an ecosystem independent of and undisturbed by external human activity. To borrow terms and definitions from the discipline of ecology to describe Tzeng Yong-ning’s art of course evolves a certain degree of appropriation.
Empty Ball-point Pen Cartridges, Tzeng Yong-ning’s Studio, Guandu, 2019. Photo: Yu Ming-lung

An Insight into Yu-ning Yang’s Paintings

Essay
Yang Yu-ning opted for vellum paper, ink and other classic oriental painting materials for this series of creation. Nevertheless, her artworks from this series rise above the boundaries defining ink painting and calligraphy painting.
Bishop’s flowers. Photo: Yang Yu-ning

Abstract Work

Catalog Entry
Wang Yigang’s Road to Abstraction
At first glance, Wang Yigang’s No. 23 of 2016 appears to be a work free of all conventions. However, the cacophony of paint and excess of artistic liberty is indicative of Wang Yigang’s mature style, and a product of the artist’s long venture into the field of abstraction.
Wang Yigang in his Studio, Shenyang, 2019. Photo: Song Zhuoran

Evaluation and Value

Essay
Xue Song’s Role as an Artist in Contemporary Culture
As a Chinese Contemporary artist, the challenge of Western art has undeniably shaped Xue Song’s practice. Consciously working within this premise, he addresses his own identity and confronts the complex history that has shaped him and the fast-changing society in which he is a part of. In this way, Xue Song’s evaluation of himself as an artist ultimately corresponds to the value of his art.
Xue Song in his Studio, Shanghai, 2017. Photo: T. Chang

Icy Tree with Silver Branches

Catalog Entry
What Liu Kuo-sung’s Icy Tree with Silver Branches Conveys Is Perseverance
Set against an icy outcrop, clusters of snow-clad branches dominate the painting. Despite the weight of winter snow, the branches remain upright and shoot toward the sky, patiently waiting for the arrival of spring.
Liu Kuo-sung, Icy Tree with Silver Branches, 2009 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Brocade of Spring

Catalog Entry
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Newest Series
The seemingly abstract works by Tzeng Yong-ning are often embedded with traditional motifs reflective of the cultural heritage of his hometown of Lukang.
Longshan Temple, Lukang. Photo: T. Chang

Landscape Uphill

Catalog Entry
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Landscapes, Passing Leaps and Bounds
Landscape – Uphill feature an ensemble of bizarre shapes stacked on top of each other. The ensemble appears to bare visual weight, especially in contrast to the small and large circles surrounding it.
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape – Uphill 04, 2020 © Tzeng Yong-ning

Alchemy

Essay
The Flower of Plenary
Tzeng Yong-ning considers himself as a “barbarian,” because the environment he grew up in, was either the countryside, in mountains or by the sea. Due to his childhood interest in art and the encouragement of his father, who was an amateur photographer, Tzeng spent a great deal of time in nature, sketching, taking photographs, and ultimately leaving a large portfolio of botanical illustrations, all of which later served as inspiration for his art. His first solo exhibition came to be titled Barbarian Garden.
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Studio, Guandu, 2019. Photo: Yu Ming-lung

The Flower of Plenary

Catalog Entry
Alchemy
In Tzeng Yong-ning’s gold-foiled The Flower of Plenary series, a large circle dominates the composition, and is in turn filled with countless smaller circles, of various patterns, colors, sizes.
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Plenary 07, 2019 – 2020 © Tzeng Yong-ning


archive

Primitive Ecology of Art

Essay
Primitive Landscape of Belief
The term “primitive” can be defined as an initial stage in evolutionary development. “Ecology” is the state in which organisms live and adapt in a given natural environment. Therefore, “primitive ecology” refers to an ecosystem independent of and undisturbed by external human activity. To borrow terms and definitions from the discipline of ecology to describe Tzeng Yong-ning’s art of course evolves a certain degree of appropriation.
Empty Ball-point Pen Cartridges, Tzeng Yong-ning’s Studio, Guandu, 2019. Photo: Yu Ming-lung

An Insight into Yu-ning Yang’s Paintings

Essay
Yang Yu-ning opted for vellum paper, ink and other classic oriental painting materials for this series of creation. Nevertheless, her artworks from this series rise above the boundaries defining ink painting and calligraphy painting.
Bishop’s flowers. Photo: Yang Yu-ning

Abstract Work

Catalog Entry
Wang Yigang’s Road to Abstraction
At first glance, Wang Yigang’s No. 23 of 2016 appears to be a work free of all conventions. However, the cacophony of paint and excess of artistic liberty is indicative of Wang Yigang’s mature style, and a product of the artist’s long venture into the field of abstraction.
Wang Yigang in his Studio, Shenyang, 2019. Photo: Song Zhuoran

Evaluation and Value

Essay
Xue Song’s Role as an Artist in Contemporary Culture
As a Chinese Contemporary artist, the challenge of Western art has undeniably shaped Xue Song’s practice. Consciously working within this premise, he addresses his own identity and confronts the complex history that has shaped him and the fast-changing society in which he is a part of. In this way, Xue Song’s evaluation of himself as an artist ultimately corresponds to the value of his art.
Xue Song in his Studio, Shanghai, 2017. Photo: T. Chang

Icy Tree with Silver Branches

Catalog Entry
What Liu Kuo-sung’s Icy Tree with Silver Branches Conveys Is Perseverance
Set against an icy outcrop, clusters of snow-clad branches dominate the painting. Despite the weight of winter snow, the branches remain upright and shoot toward the sky, patiently waiting for the arrival of spring.
Liu Kuo-sung, Icy Tree with Silver Branches, 2009 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Brocade of Spring

Catalog Entry
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Newest Series
The seemingly abstract works by Tzeng Yong-ning are often embedded with traditional motifs reflective of the cultural heritage of his hometown of Lukang.
Longshan Temple, Lukang. Photo: T. Chang

Landscape Uphill

Catalog Entry
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Landscapes, Passing Leaps and Bounds
Landscape – Uphill feature an ensemble of bizarre shapes stacked on top of each other. The ensemble appears to bare visual weight, especially in contrast to the small and large circles surrounding it.
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape – Uphill 04, 2020 © Tzeng Yong-ning

Alchemy

Essay
The Flower of Plenary
Tzeng Yong-ning considers himself as a “barbarian,” because the environment he grew up in, was either the countryside, in mountains or by the sea. Due to his childhood interest in art and the encouragement of his father, who was an amateur photographer, Tzeng spent a great deal of time in nature, sketching, taking photographs, and ultimately leaving a large portfolio of botanical illustrations, all of which later served as inspiration for his art. His first solo exhibition came to be titled Barbarian Garden.
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Studio, Guandu, 2019. Photo: Yu Ming-lung

The Flower of Plenary

Catalog Entry
Alchemy
In Tzeng Yong-ning’s gold-foiled The Flower of Plenary series, a large circle dominates the composition, and is in turn filled with countless smaller circles, of various patterns, colors, sizes.
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Plenary 07, 2019 – 2020 © Tzeng Yong-ning

Faraway Breeze

Essay
“I believe a painting should be like a poem, a song, or a beautiful prose. That is why painting a painting should be like writing a poem, singing a song, or writing a piece of prose.” – Fu Baoshi.
The first impression given by Guo Kai’s paintings is like that of a poem, a song, or a beautiful piece of prose. Poetry in painting has always been an integral part of classical Chinese painting, and Guo Kai’s paintings are particularly poetic. Plain and unadorned titles, such as Spring Stream, Winter Water, Reflection of the Bridge, or Quiet Pavilion, paired with his paintings become pieces of silent poetry.
Guo Kai examines tempera paint, Hefei, Anhui, 2018. Photo: T. Chang

Mountain Light Blown Into Wrinkles

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Starting in 1977, Liu Kuo-sung spent nearly a decade exploring and perfecting his technique of “Water-rubbing.” This dedication illustrates Liu’s “revolution against the brush,” and the notion that great painting can be created with or without the brush. Mountain Light blown into Wrinkles is a representative work from this inspiring period of experimentation and creativity.
Liu Kuo-sung, Mountain Light blown into Wrinkles, 1985 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Spring of Old Banyan

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
This painting is a representative work of Liu Kuo-sung’s “Ink-staining” technique. Liu began experimenting with technique in the 1980s; utilizing the seeping quality of ink, he rid the image of preconceived brushstrokes, in search of a more natural and spontaneous effect.
Liu Kuo-sung, Spring of Old Banyan, 1993 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Floating Mountain Peak

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Floating Mountain Peak is a major work of Liu Kuo-sung’s “Water-rubbing” technique. “Water-rubbing” is an important component to Liu’s “revolution against the brush,” and a total rejection of the dominance of refined brushwork in traditional Chinese painting.
Liu Kuo-sung, Floating Mountain Peak, 1976 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Mid-Autumn Festival

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Of Liu Kuo-sung’s abstract paintings, those with Chinese holidays as the subject matter express a very traditional sentiment. Mid-Autumn Festival celebrates the Chinese people’s poetic fascination with the moon, extending a literary tradition thousands of years old.
Liu Kuo-sung, Mid-Autumn Festival, 1969 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Purple Sun

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Liu Kuo-sung once said “although my composition is essentially a circle and an arc, the colors, technique, and texture are greatly different.” Purple Sun is a prime example of a painting from the Space Series, composed of an upper circle and lower arc, in which the colors, technique, and texture are remarkable and visually stunning.
Liu Kuo-sung, Purple Sun, 1970 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

The High Tide of Qiantang River

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
This is an early representational work of Liu Kuo-sung’s “Water-rubbing” technique. “Water-rubbing” involves dripping drops of ink onto a water’s surface, then as the ink slowly spreads within the water, rice paper is placed onto the water to absorb the ink as it appears on the surface.
Liu Kuo-sung, The High Tide of Qiantang River, 1974 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Faraway Breeze

Essay
“I believe a painting should be like a poem, a song, or a beautiful prose. That is why painting a painting should be like writing a poem, singing a song, or writing a piece of prose.” – Fu Baoshi.
The first impression given by Guo Kai’s paintings is like that of a poem, a song, or a beautiful piece of prose. Poetry in painting has always been an integral part of classical Chinese painting, and Guo Kai’s paintings are particularly poetic. Plain and unadorned titles, such as Spring Stream, Winter Water, Reflection of the Bridge, or Quiet Pavilion, paired with his paintings become pieces of silent poetry.
Guo Kai examines tempera paint, Hefei, Anhui, 2018. Photo: T. Chang

Icy Tree with Silver Branches

Catalog Entry
What Liu Kuo-sung’s Icy Tree with Silver Branches Conveys Is Perseverance
Set against an icy outcrop, clusters of snow-clad branches dominate the painting. Despite the weight of winter snow, the branches remain upright and shoot toward the sky, patiently waiting for the arrival of spring.
Liu Kuo-sung, Icy Tree with Silver Branches, 2009 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Mountain Light Blown Into Wrinkles

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Starting in 1977, Liu Kuo-sung spent nearly a decade exploring and perfecting his technique of “Water-rubbing.” This dedication illustrates Liu’s “revolution against the brush,” and the notion that great painting can be created with or without the brush. Mountain Light blown into Wrinkles is a representative work from this inspiring period of experimentation and creativity.
Liu Kuo-sung, Mountain Light blown into Wrinkles, 1985 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Spring of Old Banyan

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
This painting is a representative work of Liu Kuo-sung’s “Ink-staining” technique. Liu began experimenting with technique in the 1980s; utilizing the seeping quality of ink, he rid the image of preconceived brushstrokes, in search of a more natural and spontaneous effect.
Liu Kuo-sung, Spring of Old Banyan, 1993 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Floating Mountain Peak

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Floating Mountain Peak is a major work of Liu Kuo-sung’s “Water-rubbing” technique. “Water-rubbing” is an important component to Liu’s “revolution against the brush,” and a total rejection of the dominance of refined brushwork in traditional Chinese painting.
Liu Kuo-sung, Floating Mountain Peak, 1976 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Mid-Autumn Festival

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Of Liu Kuo-sung’s abstract paintings, those with Chinese holidays as the subject matter express a very traditional sentiment. Mid-Autumn Festival celebrates the Chinese people’s poetic fascination with the moon, extending a literary tradition thousands of years old.
Liu Kuo-sung, Mid-Autumn Festival, 1969 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Purple Sun

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
Liu Kuo-sung once said “although my composition is essentially a circle and an arc, the colors, technique, and texture are greatly different.” Purple Sun is a prime example of a painting from the Space Series, composed of an upper circle and lower arc, in which the colors, technique, and texture are remarkable and visually stunning.
Liu Kuo-sung, Purple Sun, 1970 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

The High Tide of Qiantang River

Catalog Entry
The Scripture of a Missionary of Modern Ink Painting II
This is an early representational work of Liu Kuo-sung’s “Water-rubbing” technique. “Water-rubbing” involves dripping drops of ink onto a water’s surface, then as the ink slowly spreads within the water, rice paper is placed onto the water to absorb the ink as it appears on the surface.
Liu Kuo-sung, The High Tide of Qiantang River, 1974 © The Liu Kuo-sung Archives

Primitive Ecology of Art

Essay
Primitive Landscape of Belief
The term “primitive” can be defined as an initial stage in evolutionary development. “Ecology” is the state in which organisms live and adapt in a given natural environment. Therefore, “primitive ecology” refers to an ecosystem independent of and undisturbed by external human activity. To borrow terms and definitions from the discipline of ecology to describe Tzeng Yong-ning’s art of course evolves a certain degree of appropriation.
Empty Ball-point Pen Cartridges, Tzeng Yong-ning’s Studio, Guandu, 2019. Photo: Yu Ming-lung

Brocade of Spring

Catalog Entry
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Newest Series
The seemingly abstract works by Tzeng Yong-ning are often embedded with traditional motifs reflective of the cultural heritage of his hometown of Lukang.
Longshan Temple, Lukang. Photo: T. Chang

Landscape Uphill

Catalog Entry
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Landscapes, Passing Leaps and Bounds
Landscape – Uphill feature an ensemble of bizarre shapes stacked on top of each other. The ensemble appears to bare visual weight, especially in contrast to the small and large circles surrounding it.
Tzeng Yong-ning, Landscape – Uphill 04, 2020 © Tzeng Yong-ning

Alchemy

Essay
The Flower of Plenary
Tzeng Yong-ning considers himself as a “barbarian,” because the environment he grew up in, was either the countryside, in mountains or by the sea. Due to his childhood interest in art and the encouragement of his father, who was an amateur photographer, Tzeng spent a great deal of time in nature, sketching, taking photographs, and ultimately leaving a large portfolio of botanical illustrations, all of which later served as inspiration for his art. His first solo exhibition came to be titled Barbarian Garden.
Tzeng Yong-ning’s Studio, Guandu, 2019. Photo: Yu Ming-lung

The Flower of Plenary

Catalog Entry
Alchemy
In Tzeng Yong-ning’s gold-foiled The Flower of Plenary series, a large circle dominates the composition, and is in turn filled with countless smaller circles, of various patterns, colors, sizes.
Tzeng Yong-ning, The Flower of Plenary 07, 2019 – 2020 © Tzeng Yong-ning

Abstract Work

Catalog Entry
Wang Yigang’s Road to Abstraction
At first glance, Wang Yigang’s No. 23 of 2016 appears to be a work free of all conventions. However, the cacophony of paint and excess of artistic liberty is indicative of Wang Yigang’s mature style, and a product of the artist’s long venture into the field of abstraction.
Wang Yigang in his Studio, Shenyang, 2019. Photo: Song Zhuoran

Evaluation and Value

Essay
Xue Song’s Role as an Artist in Contemporary Culture
As a Chinese Contemporary artist, the challenge of Western art has undeniably shaped Xue Song’s practice. Consciously working within this premise, he addresses his own identity and confronts the complex history that has shaped him and the fast-changing society in which he is a part of. In this way, Xue Song’s evaluation of himself as an artist ultimately corresponds to the value of his art.
Xue Song in his Studio, Shanghai, 2017. Photo: T. Chang

An Insight into Yu-ning Yang’s Paintings

Essay
Yang Yu-ning opted for vellum paper, ink and other classic oriental painting materials for this series of creation. Nevertheless, her artworks from this series rise above the boundaries defining ink painting and calligraphy painting.
Bishop’s flowers. Photo: Yang Yu-ning